Palouse Falls

Palouse Falls
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Palouse Falls is a remote waterfall on the Palouse River. It is 4 mi (6.4 km) upstream from where the river joins the Snake River. Both of these are in the state of Washington, in the United States.

Interestingly, the falls constitute the central feature of the Palouse Falls State Park.

In 1984, the government proposed to construct a 98 ft (30 m) high dam upstream from the falls, to provide less expensive hydroelectricity for the region. However, a significant majority of local residents voted against the construction as they preferred to retain the higher electric rates in return for preserving the falls.

 

Palouse Falls
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Palouse Falls Characteristics and Origins

This is a two-tiered waterfall. The first drop is small, with the upper falls measuring only 18 ft (5.9 m). The second drop lies approximately 1,000 ft (305 m) from the upper falls. The lower falls portion is about 180 ft (55 m). Further, both sections of the falls lie within a canyon which measures approximately 337 ft (115 m) in depth and is surrounded by vast scablands.

Missoula Floods which swept through the region repeatedly during the Pleistocene epoch formed both the canyon and falls.

In 2014, Palouse Falls became the official waterfall of Washington State.

Check out our articles on Gocta Cataracts, Yosemite Falls, Ebor Falls and Devils Kettle Falls

Todd Sain Sr.